Building Block Play Preschool Children

Building Block Play Preschool Children

Many early childhood educators believe that every classroom should have a full set of unit blocks, assorted props tied to children’s current interests and experiences, open storage shelves, and plenty of space and time to build and rebuild invented and familiar structures. Canvassing Young Children consulting editors, I asked, “What do you think children learn through block play?” The responses were varied, but all agreed on the importance of block play in early childhood education. Through block play, children learn to solve problems, explore new materials, and create things that are only limited by their imagination. They also learn important social skills, such as cooperation and communication. In addition, block play provides opportunities for children to developing fine motor skills and practice math concepts such as measurement and sequencing. Ultimately, block play is an essential part of a well-rounded early childhood education.

It is widely accepted among early childhood educators that block play is an important part of child development. Blocks provide children with a way to explore, create, and problem-solve. Through block play, children can learn about shapes, sizes, and numbers. They can also develop fine motor skills and learn to cooperate with others. Perhaps most importantly, block play gives children a chance to express themselves creatively. Given all of these benefits, it is no wonder that so many educators believe that every classroom should have a full set of unit blocks. With such a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and colors, blocks offer endless opportunities for exploration and creativity. Whether children are building houses or castles, the possibilities are endless. So next time you are in a preschool classroom, take a look around and see if you can spot the blocks. Chances are, they will be one of the most popular toys in the room!